Teach Reading With the “Does it look right?” Prompt

“Does it look right?” is another important prompt or reading strategy that you can use to teach your child how to read.  

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What does it mean? Your child is reading a new sentence and comes to a word she doesn’t know. She makes an attempt and says a word that’s not quite right. With this prompt, what you’re asking is does the word on the page look like the word she just said or read? You’re teaching your child to check the word.  Are all the letters there to make the sounds that just came out of her mouth?
Let’s look at this sentence:
“Mother baked a tart for Grandma.”

tart

What if your child says pie instead of tart because she looked at the picture for help which is a good thing to do?
You can say, yes, it could be pie, but what letter would you have to see at the beginning of the word if it were pie? (Make the ‘p’ sound.) It would have to be a ‘p’ but there’s a ‘t’ instead. (Point to the first letter of the word and make the ‘t’ sound.) What could it be instead of pie? Could it be tart? Let’s check to see if the letters are there for the word tart. Say the sounds slowly, t-a-r-t, while checking by running your finger slowly under the word.
We do this all the time when reading. We check to see that all the sounds we’re saying are on the page. We’re checking if the word looks right. Your brain does this so quickly you don’t even know it’s happening. We have to show children how do this. Some children pick it up naturally, others don’t and we need to teach it.

How to read a book to your child…

1. Do what comes naturally.

Use your common sense and take your cues from your child. Trust your instincts.

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2. Read with expression! 

Ham it up! Use different voices for different characters. I love doing the voice of the Big, Bad Wolf in The Three Little Pigs -“I’LL HUFF AND I’LL PUFF, 8319124_origAND I’LL BLOOOWWW YOUR HOUSE DOWN!”

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Top 5 Pre-Reading Tips

1. Rich oral language makes learning to read easier.

The better your child’s oral language is, the more language your child has heard, the easier it will be for your child to learn to read. It’s important to expose your baby and toddler to as much oral language as possible. You want your child to learn lots of new words and sentence structures before formal school even begins. And, how do you do that?

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So, you’d like to teach your child to read…

You’ve come to the right place. 

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Hi, I’m Oksanna.

2880oksannacrawley-croppedI’m a retired, certified early literacy teacher with over 25 years teaching experience in Canadian schools. As a Reading Recovery teacher, I taught grade one children who were having the most difficult time learning to read. I also taught kindergarten for many years and loved it!
I have a passion for teaching children how to read. You’re here because you want to help your child become a reader (and a writer), and I applaud you for that.
Here, you’ll find advice on how to instil a love of reading, how to pick the right books to teach reading, how to teach reading strategies, and how to teach letters and their sounds.
The information on this blog is aimed at children who are not yet reading or are just starting to.

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