Teach Reading With the “Does it Sound Right?” Prompt

Does it sound right?  

Your child is reading along and gets one of the words wrong. It doesn’t fit. It’s the wrong part of speech. Do you ask him to try again and sound it out?  No. You can teach him something more useful.  You can ask: Does that sound right?  Do we talk that way?

Super Hammy Makes a Snowman - cover

This is the reading strategy I discussed in a previous post.  Your child will be using her knowledge of her oral language, of how language “works” to figure out a word while reading a story.
The word she ultimately choses has to, not only make sense given what the story is about, but it also must sound right.  As adults, we do this without thinking when we’re reading, but when a child is learning to read, it must be taught.
How do you do that? Basically, you’ll be asking your child if her choice of word sounds right? Is that how we talk?  Can we say it like that?

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What is the “Does it sound right?” Reading Prompt?

Does it sound right?  This is another very important reading strategy that piggy-backs on a child’s knowledge of oral language – of how language works.

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For example, when a child is reading a sentence and comes to a word he or she doesn’t know, the brain is searching for suitable possibilities.  We ask not only what word would make sense here, as discussed in my previous post, but also what word would fit here? What word would sound right?

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Let’s look at how this works.

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Top 5 Pre-Reading Tips

1. Rich oral language makes learning to read easier.

The better your child’s oral language is, the more language your child has heard, the easier it will be for your child to learn to read. It’s important to expose your baby and toddler to as much oral language as possible. You want your child to learn lots of new words and sentence structures before formal school even begins. And, how do you do that?

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